Digital access/privacy/security

Links related to the Magna Carta, rights and the internet

A Magna Carta for the Next Industrial Revolution

The Magna Carta planted the early seeds of the rights and freedoms that would later be incorporated into democratic society and became an enduring symbol of how trust sits at the heart of a fully functioning society. In a digital age where people have access to information like never before, the need for trust in business and society is greater than ever. This piece from pwc.com argues the need for a new Magna Carta for the digital age. Click here to view the article.

British Library: My Digital Rights

Magna Carta: My Digital Rights provides free classroom resources to support Secondary  students and teachers as they consider their rights and responsibilities online. You can also submit a clause for a Digital Magna Carta (deadline 1 June 2015). Access it here.

New Zealand Human Rights Blog: Is access to the internet a human right?

This two part blog series asks the question is access to the internet a human right. It is well researched and while the answer isn’t clear, the debate is very interesting. You can find part one here and part two here.

TED Talk: Tim Berners-Lee: A Magna Carta for the web

Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it’s worth a listen when he warns us: There’s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web’s wide-open spaces. It’s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness. The question is, What kind of Internet do we want? You can watch the six minute talk here and read the transcript here. Additionally there is an NZ 3News article here.

TED Article: What are you revealing online? Much more than you think.

In this conversation with computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck and privacy economist Alessandro Acquisti the discussion focuses around what the web knows about you, and what we can do about the things we’d rather it forgot. This gets at the heart of the privacy vs security on the web debate. You can read it here.

TED Talk: Glenn Greenwald: Why privacy matters

In this twenty minute talk, journalist Glenn Greenwald argues for why you need to care about privacy, even if you’re “not doing anything you need to hide.” You can watch it here.

Media Studies Journal of Aotearoa New Zealand: Vol 14, No 2 (2014): The End of the Open Internet: Surveillance, Copyright, Privacy

This issue of MEDIANZ contains papers and addresses most of which were first presented to the Surveillance, Copyright, Privacy conference in January 2014. As a whole, the issue contextualises and critiques surveillance, copyright and privacy concerns across a range of papers. After an editorial that frames the emergence of the debates in a local context, it presents seven papers, including three by original keynote speakers, Nicky Hager, Professor Graham Murdock and internet law expert Judge David Harvey. The papers address state mass surveillance, the erosion of citizenship, anti-surveillance software, digital mimicry and Big Data, the survival of the Creative Commons, and legislative responses to surveillance challenges. You can access the issue by clicking here.

NZ Herald: Snowden revelations / The price of the Five Eyes club: Mass spying on friendly nations

This large piece alleges that NZ’s electronic surveillance agency, the GCSB, has dramatically expanded its spying operations during the years of John Key’s Government and is automatically funnelling vast amounts of intelligence to the US National Security Agency in the name of collective security. You can read it here.

NZ Labour want a digital bill of rights

This article discribes how in the 2014 election Labour promised to introduce a digital bill of rights to guarantee internet access and protect against blanket mass surveillance by spy agencies.You can read the story here.

Related internet/privacy organisations

Internet NZ

Office of the Privacy Commissioner – You can sign up to hear about their privacy forums here.

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